ZThemes
mspbandj:

ron-daralki:

sheck-the-wulfy:

THIS HASN’T CROSSED MY DASH IN WEEKS

THIS HASN’T CROSSED MY DASH IN MONTHS! WHY HASN’T IT CROSSED IT IN MONTHS?

IM SITTING IN THE MIDDLE OF MY EMPTY HOUSE LAUGHING LIKE A FUCKING MANIAC AND ITS ECHOING WHAT THE FUCK IS HAPPENING OH MY GOD

mspbandj:

ron-daralki:

sheck-the-wulfy:

THIS HASN’T CROSSED MY DASH IN WEEKS

THIS HASN’T CROSSED MY DASH IN MONTHS! WHY HASN’T IT CROSSED IT IN MONTHS?

IM SITTING IN THE MIDDLE OF MY EMPTY HOUSE LAUGHING LIKE A FUCKING MANIAC AND ITS ECHOING WHAT THE FUCK IS HAPPENING OH MY GOD

stickmarionette:

chaila:

helenhasnomiddlename:

(Includes some spoilers)
On Mako and Stacker’s relationship
In the beginning when Mako is introduced to Raleigh, she says “Imeji to chigau,” to Stacker, meaning “(he) is different than I thought.” When I heard her say this, I thought it was weird for her to use such informal language towards her superior. If she were actually talking to her superior, she would have said “Imeji to chigaimasu," which would be a more formal way of saying so. I thought it was a minor slip-up with the script, as not many writers look too much into the culture basics of foreign languages when writing dialogue (although towards Raleigh, she speaks formally). Later on we find out that she is actually his adoptive daughter, and I realized why she used such informal language. Although in English, she may speak to Stacker in a way of talking to her superior, in Japanese, her mother tongue, she uses an informal, friendly way of talking to Stacker, her father figure. 

I love that the movie paid attention to this. I loved the little ways it became clear that he, as her adoptive dad, didn’t force her out of her native language or culture, but instead tried to adopt some of it with her, in a respectful way. He speaks Japanese with her—does she speak Japanese to anyone in this movie besides him, apart from the response to Raleigh?—he bows in greeting, etc. She’s speaking English with him when updating him as her superior about the candidate trials, but when she starts to get angry and beg for the chance he promised her, she switches to Japanese. When he’s telling her “More control” during the fight, he does it in Japanese but he calls her “Miss Mori” like a superior would. It’s this really great mix of informal family intimacy and the formality of their now professional relationship, and it shows a lot of mutual respect. These little moments revealed the closeness of their relationship, the way their family bond is intertwined with the formal rank structure, the way they’ve built a solid family of two, in really subtle ways. 
It is little things like this that surprised me in a thoroughly pleasant way about the movie, and are why I really liked it a lot. I like that the movie took *time* to pay attention to these things, took time to give us little moments whose implications mean a lot for the characters, amidst the dinosaur-punching. 

Frankly it’s a miracle that any Hollywood production paid this much attention to a foreign culture/language. Love it.

stickmarionette:

chaila:

helenhasnomiddlename:

(Includes some spoilers)

On Mako and Stacker’s relationship

In the beginning when Mako is introduced to Raleigh, she says “Imeji to chigau,” to Stacker, meaning “(he) is different than I thought.” When I heard her say this, I thought it was weird for her to use such informal language towards her superior. If she were actually talking to her superior, she would have said “Imeji to chigaimasu," which would be a more formal way of saying so. I thought it was a minor slip-up with the script, as not many writers look too much into the culture basics of foreign languages when writing dialogue (although towards Raleigh, she speaks formally). Later on we find out that she is actually his adoptive daughter, and I realized why she used such informal language. Although in English, she may speak to Stacker in a way of talking to her superior, in Japanese, her mother tongue, she uses an informal, friendly way of talking to Stacker, her father figure. 

I love that the movie paid attention to this. I loved the little ways it became clear that he, as her adoptive dad, didn’t force her out of her native language or culture, but instead tried to adopt some of it with her, in a respectful way. He speaks Japanese with her—does she speak Japanese to anyone in this movie besides him, apart from the response to Raleigh?—he bows in greeting, etc. She’s speaking English with him when updating him as her superior about the candidate trials, but when she starts to get angry and beg for the chance he promised her, she switches to Japanese. When he’s telling her “More control” during the fight, he does it in Japanese but he calls her “Miss Mori” like a superior would. It’s this really great mix of informal family intimacy and the formality of their now professional relationship, and it shows a lot of mutual respect. These little moments revealed the closeness of their relationship, the way their family bond is intertwined with the formal rank structure, the way they’ve built a solid family of two, in really subtle ways. 

It is little things like this that surprised me in a thoroughly pleasant way about the movie, and are why I really liked it a lot. I like that the movie took *time* to pay attention to these things, took time to give us little moments whose implications mean a lot for the characters, amidst the dinosaur-punching. 

Frankly it’s a miracle that any Hollywood production paid this much attention to a foreign culture/language. Love it.

tenshi-art:

Loki (Marvel)

vortisaurus:

i would like to present to you the delightful mental image of jaeger pilots crossing their fingers that there is not a kaiju attack anytime in the next week, because otherwise they’ll have to sync up to achieve a neural handshake and their drift partner will probably find out what they’re getting for their birthday

gingersnapwolves:

audible-smiles:

Why is it always “Dumbledore is my fave” or “Dumbledore is abusive” and never “Dumbledore is so fucking afraid of letting another dark wizard come to power that he channels his own darkness into training a human weapon from childhood to fight the darkness that he knows he can’t while pretending to be the wise wizard mentor that he wishes he actually was wow that is a super fascinating character and we should write all the fanfiction about it?”

Dumbledore is a great character. He’s not a great *person*, but he’s definitely a fascinating character. I wish JKR had explored that whole thing a little better, so yeah, I would definitely read a bunch of fanfic about Dumbledore’s POV during the whole thing.

a letter from the end of the first week of hogwarts

albus severus: dear mum and dad
albus severus: i was in the library today
albus severus: reading a book about previous heads of hogwarts
albus severus: and i would just like to say
albus severus: are you fucking serious
albus severus: i demand a name change immediately
albus severus: just literally anything else please
albus severus: fucking dobby kreacher potter for all i care
albus severus: sorry for swearing i just
albus severus: bloody hell
albus severus: yours sincerely,
albus severus: aragog fang potter or some shit

muddyinsanity:

The Spaceport

this movie was the coolest fucking thing and it makes me really sad that they cut off the second one

winterthirst:

sabacc:

Steve Rogers did, in fact, realize that something was off when he saw the outline of the woman’s odd bra (a push-up bra, he would later learn), but being an officer and a gentleman, he said that it was the game that gave the future away.

 (via)